"History of Worcester and Its People"

Lewis Historical Publishing Company New York City 1919

By: Charles Nutt

Volume 3 (part)

Marcia Payne’s transcription of individual biographies as posted on the MAWORCES-list beginning June 20, 2003. Vol. 3 / part 1

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Click on the name below to be taken to the biography.
Aldrich , Charles Francis Aldrich , Peleg Emory Ayers , Charles Elton
Bemis , John Merrick Bemis , Dr. Merrick Bisco , Edward Foster
Blanchard , Curtis Royal Boyle , Charles Francis Brooks , George Francis
Callahan , Daniel Patrick Carter , D. William Clark , Capt. Leonard
Clark , Walter William Clark , William Benjamin Clark , Jonas Gilman
Chamberlain , Frederick Herbert Chamberlain , John Converse , Myron F.
Converse , Frederick S. Crawford , William Henry Crawford , Barry Colvin
Dexter , William Henry Early , James Heywood , Albert Samuel
Heywood , Frank Everett Heywood , Samuel Richardson Hildreth , Charles Elbridge
Hildreth , Samuel Elbridge Martin , Frank Charles Morgan , Ralph Landers
Sawyer , Bertice Felton



History of Worcester and Its People Lewis Historical Publishing Company New York City 1919 By: Charles Nutt Volume 3 pages 147 & 148

Bertice Felton SAWYER, Secretary of the Worcester Bank and Trust Company, was bon in Hudson, Mass., April 20, 1868, son of Daniel H. and Angelina E. (FELTON) SAWYER. His father was born in Bolton, February 19, 1837, still living. His mother was born at Marlborough, June 14, 1843. In his boyhood he attended the Providence, Ledge and Washington Street public schools of this city, and the Classical High School, from which he graduated in the class of 1887. He began his career in banking in June, 1887, as messenger in the City National Bank of Worcester, being promoted later to positions of greater responsibility and trust, clerk, bookkeeper, teller, assistant cashier, successively, and in 1898 he succeeded Nathaniel PAINE as cashier. When the City National Bank was merged with the Worcester Safe Deposit & Trust Company in February, 1903, he was appointed credit manager. In 1912 he became actuary of this bank, then known as the Worcester Trust Company. In 1917, he was promoted to his present position, secretary of the Worcester Bank & Trust Company. Mr. SAWYER is a member of the Church of the Covenant of this city, and was formerly superintendent of the Sunday school of the Coral Street Methodist Church.

Mr. SAWYER married, in this city, October 26, 1893, Cora Edna PERRY, who was born in Putnam, Conn., May 24, 1863, daughter of Elisha F. and Mary Jane (RANDALL) PERRY. Her father was born in Thompson, Conn., March 20, 1836, died July 9, 1911; her mother was born in Fisherville, Mass., March 8, 1840. Mr. and Mrs. SAWYER reside at No. 53 Davidson Road in this city. They have six children: Everett P., born Sept. 29, 1894, graduate of the English High School, 1914; Hazel A., born Feb. 16, 1896, graduate of the North High School, 1915; Irving P., born April 28, 1897; Myrtle F., born August 13, 1898, graduate of the English High School, 1916; Mary Elizabeth, born Feb. 22, 1900, graduate of the North High School, 1918; Bertice R., born July 23, 1901, graduate of the North High School, 1918.


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Found: “History of Worcester and Its People”, by Charles Nutt; Volume 3, Lewis Historical Publishing Company, NY City; 1919 pages 70, 71

George Francis Brooks: General manager and treasurer of the Harrington & Richardson Arms Company, was born in Rindge, NH, August 23, 1856, son of William S. and Jane Frances (Parks) Brooks. Hs father was born in Rindge, March 17, 1822; his mother in Winchendon, Feb. 22, 1831. Mr. Brooks has 2 sisters and 4 brothers. George F. Brooks attended the district schools and the high school, leaving at the end of his first term to enter Howe’s Business College in this city, from which he entered the employ of the Harrington & Richardson Arms Company, as bookkeeper in March 1878, and has been with that concern from that time to the present. He was promoted step by step, becoming the general manager in 1897 and treasurer of the corporation. Under his management the works have been enlarged, the business expanded and a highly prosperous business maintained. Single barrel shotguns have been made since 1900 in addition to the great variety of revolvers. In 1904 the machinery of John P. Lovell Company of Portland, Maine, was purchased, and as that company had manufactured handcuffs, their manufacture was continued. The Harrington & Richardson Arms Company now makes revolvers, shotguns and handcuffs, employing about six hundred hands. Mr. Brooks is a director of the Arms Company; also of the New England Envelope Company and the Worcester Bank and Trust Company. He has taken an important part in the public affairs. He served for 14 years on the school committee, 1890, 1891, & 1892; and from 1895 to 1905, being vice-chairman 2 years and chairman for 2 years. He was a member of the Board of Alderman 6 years, from 1906 to 1911, ad part of the time its president. Since 1912 he has been a member of the Board of Overseers of the Poor. He was elected in 1916 a member of the state constitutional convention of 1917. Always a staunch Republican, he has never allowed partisan politics to control his action against the public interest. Courage, ability and fidelity to high ideals of public service have always characterized his public work. Of unquestioned natural qualifications, and splendidly trained by both business and political experience, Mr. Brooks has been a model public servant. **END of PAGE 70: to be continued page 71** He is a member of Montacute Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Quinsigamond Lodge, Independent Order Of Odd Fellows; Cherokee Tribe, Improved Order of Red Men; Victor Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen; the Chamber of Commerce; the Worcester Commercial Travelers Association: the Pubic Education Association; the Worcester Society of Antiquity; the Worcester Agricultural Society; the Worcester Natural History Society. He was vice-president of the Board of Trade (now Chamber of Commerce) in 1906 and president in 1907. He has been deacon of the Pleasant Street Baptist Church since 1896, and is now clerk. For 30 years he was superintendent of the Sunday School. He is an officer and an active member of the Baptist City Mission Board. Mr. Brooks married, in this city, Nov. 24, 1881, Amanda H. Davie, who was born in Brockton, April 2, 1854, daughter of Joseph and Deborah W. (Manter) Davie. Her father was born in Plymouth, Oct 19, 1815, died in this city, Sept. 24, 1881; her mother was born in that town, April 6, 1821, died Feb. 11, 1895. Mrs. Brooks is a member of the Home Club and of the Woman’s Club of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Brooks have 4 children:

#1 Lillian M., born Nov. 17, 1883; graduate of Wellesley (A.B., 1906), married May 8, 1912, LaForest H. Howe.

#2 Ralph E., born May 14, 1887; graduate of the English High School, 1906; student in the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 3 and a half years, now foreman for the Harrigton & Richardson Arms Company; married April 18, 1912, Grace F. Estabrook

#3 Ida F., born April 13, 1890, graduate of the Classical High School, 1908, of Wellesley College (A.B. 1912); married, Oct. 29, 1913, J. Willard MacGregor

#4 Elizabeth G., born August 23, 1897, graduate of the Classical High School, 1914, student in Wellesley College, class of 1919.

THE END


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Edward Foster BISCO “History of Worcester and Its People”, Volume 3, by Charles Nutt; Lewis Historical Publishing Company, NY City, 1919 Pages 243, 244

Retired banker, first president of the Worcester Trust Company, was born in Leicester, Mass., Feb. 19, 1844, and died in this city, Jan. 2, 1918, son of Dwight and Ruth (Woodcock) Bisco. He received his education in the public schools of his native town, graduating in the class of 1862 from the High School. His career began in the same year in the Leicester Bank, afterward the Leicester National Bank, where he was employed for 3 years. In October, 1865, he took a position in the National Park Bank, of New York City, where he gained valuable experience of metropolitan banking, filling various positions. He came to this city, July 1, 1872, to become secretary of the Worcester Safe Deposit and Trust Company, succeeding Samuel T. Bigelow, and he made his home here during the remainder of his life. He continued as secretary of this bank and was an important factor in its growth and extension until October 1891, when he was elected its president. In 1903 there was a revolution in the banking interests of this city. The control of the Safe Deposit and Trust Company changed hands. The charter was especially desired on account of its wide powers for doing business. The Central National Bank and the City National Bank were absorbed, and soon afterwards, in the same year, the First National and the Citizens National. The name was then simplified and became the Worcester Trust Company. When Mr. Bisco became an officer of the company in 1872, the deposits amounted to about $1,200,000.00; at the time of the consolidation they aggregated $ 3,300,000.00; and afterward about $ 9,000,000.00

The shrewd and prudent management of Mr. Bisco had much to do with bringing his bank to the foremost rank among the banks and trusts companies of the State, the largest outside of Boston. He was called to the presidency of the Washington Trust Company of Boston, October 1, 1904. This banking house was located at No. 20 Milk Street, Boston. He continued in this position until August 1906. Mr. Bisco took rank among the best known and most successful bankers of Massachusetts. He won this position through natural ability and constant attention to duty. He began at the bottom with a salary of $100.00 a year. He was a member of the Commonwealth Club, the Tatassit Canoe Club; and a trustee of the People’s Saving Bank. In politics he was a Republican; for many years a commissioner of the Jacques Fund of the city hospital.

Mr. Bisco married, November 29, 1866, Anna Eliza Sprague, daughter of Austin and Laura (Wilson) Sprague, of Leicester. She is a descendant of William Sprague, one of the founders of Hingham, Mass. Their only child was Adeline Maud Bisco. Mr. Bisco and his family attended the First Universalist Church. His home was at No. 17 Irving Street. Dwight Bisco, his father, was born in Spencer, April 21, 1799; became a card clothing manufacturer in Leicester in the firm of Bisco & Denny; prominent in town affairs, selectman many years, representative to the General Court; director of the Leicester Bank; deacon of the Congregational Church; married at Leicester, Jan. 8, 1826, Ruth Woodcock. They lived to celebrate their golden wedding. She died Sept. 20, 1876, and he died Dec. 7, 1882. Henry Bisco, son of Dwight Bisco, also followed his father in the card clothing business; served in the Civil War.

The Bisco family is descended from Edward Bisco, one of the founders of Watertown, Mass., and from many other pioneers of the Commonwealth. The Bisco line is Edward F., Dwight, Jacob, John, Thomas, John, Thomas, John, Nathaniel, Edward, John, Edward.

Edward Bisco, the English progenitor, as the line is traced, lived at Little Missenden, Buckshire, England, died in May 1563. Nathaniel Bisco (4), was the immigrant, born at Little Missenden, Nov. 16, 1595; settled in Watertown, Mass., but returned to England about 1651; was known as the “rich tanner”.

John Bisco (9) was the first of the Bisco family to settle in Spencer, Mass.; served in many town offices, and was a member of the State Constitutional Convention.


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“History of Worcester and its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3; Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York City; 1919 Pages 143, 144

James Early, bank president, probation officer, deputy sheriff, was born in Ireland, March 19, 1853. He attended the national schools in his native place, and after coming to this city, when a young man, attended the evening schools. He engaged in business in April 1878, in partnership with Nathaniel E. Mansfield under the firm name of Early & Mansfield, dealing in groceries at No. 35 Main Street. In the following year he bought out his partner and became sole proprietor, continuing in business under his own name for a period of 20 years.

Mr. Early was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Samuel D. Nye in January 1890, and has been re-appointed at the expiration of each term of his office by General Robert H. Chamberlain, Major Benjamin D. Dwinell and Albert F. Richardson, the sheriffs since that time. He was appointed probation officer by the Superior Court in January 1906, to succeed Colonel James M. Drennan and he has served in that office to the present time. In politics Mr. Early is a Democrat. He represented Ward 4 in the Common Council from 1884 to 1887, inclusive, and was a member of the board of trustees of the City Hospital in 1885, 1886 and 1887. He served on nearly all the important committees of the council, also for 10 years on the board of registrars of voters and 4 years on the liquor license commission. He has been one of the civil service examiners for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the past 30 years.

Enlisting in the Worcester City Guards, Company A, 10TH Regiment of Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, in May 1870, he took part in the muster at Concord under General Benjamin F. Butler in that year, serving as quartermaster sergeant, 1st sergeant and later as 1st lieutenant. He resigned in June 1886. Mr. Early has served in various other offices of trust and responsibility and on various commissions. He has been associated with Leander F. Herrick as official adjuster of damages caused by taking property by the right of eminent domain by the City of Worcester during the years of 1905-17, including all damages caused by the separation of railroad and highway crossings at grade.

Mr. Early is a member of the Washington Social Club of which he has been president; Catholic Order of Foresters; the Worcester Country Club, the Worcester Economic Club, the Worcester Agricultural Society, the Worcester County Mechanics Association. He is an honorary member of the Worcester City Guards, the Emmet Guards, the Worcester Continentals and associate member of George H. Ward Post, No. 10, Grand Army of the Republic. He served 10 years as treasurer of the Worcester County Retail Grocers Association. He is a communicant of St. Paul’s Catholic Church. He has been a trustee of the Bay State Savings Bank since 1895, member of the board of investment since 1902, and president since June 1914. Mr. Early married Mary Ann Kean, who was born in this city, graduated from the Worcester State Normal School and was principal of the Union Hill School. Mrs. Early died October 9, 1891. They had 2 children: Mary, who was the 1st child of a graduate of the Worcester Normal School graduating from the same school; now a teacher in the public schools of this city. Edward, graduate of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, in the electrical engineering course, now a consulting engineer of the Moody Engineering Company, No. 115 Broadway, New York City. Mr. Early resides at No. 97 Elm Street in this city. His offices are at No. 620 State Mutual building. He shared offices for many years with the late Colonel Drennan.

Mr. Early has record of faithful and able public service equalled by few men in this city. Perhaps no man in the county is more widely known. In the various important and difficult tasks that have been assigned to him, he has exercised a genius for bringing harmony out of discord, in adjusting differences of innumerable kinds. As a peace maker, he has no equal. His natural tact, common sense, and clear vision have qualified him in an unusual degree for his duties as court officer, as a arbitrator and commissioner. Even in political offices he has commanded the esteem and confidence of his Republican associates as fully as those of his Democratic colleagues.

THE END


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Charles Francis Boyle page161

Lawyer, was born in this city, Oct. 7, 1889, son of Patrick and Bridget (Joyce) Boyle. His father was a native of Ireland, coming to this country when 16 years old with his parents, who settled in Milford, Mass. There he followed the trade of shoemaker until the Civil War. He enlisted from Milford in Company C, 25th Regiment Infantry, Mass. Volunteers, Jan. 1, 1864; was wounded in the battle of Cold Harbor; was mustered out with his regiment, July 13, 1865. This was a Worcester County regiment, commanded by Colonel Josiah Pickett and later by Colonel James Tucker, of Boston. After the war he was in the regular army for 3 years. He then followed his trade in Milford until late in the ‘70’s when he came to Worcester. He was in the employ of Samuel R. Heywood, shoe manufacturer for a number of years. He married Bridget Joyce, born in Ireland, now living with her son, Charles F. Boyle, at No. 70 Hamilton Street, Worcester. Patrick Boyle died in Worcester, May 2, 1891, aged 44 years. He was the father of 6 children, of whom 4 are now living. Luke A., died age 43 years, a machinist of Worcester; Mary Jane married William J. Bulger, of Worcester; Annie T. married Myles Costello, foreman of the “Post” composing room, formerly foreman of the “Daily Spy” composing room, and they have 3 children: Myles Jr., Edward and Dorothy Costello; Catherine V., married Clifford P. Graton, steam fitter, Worcester; Frank P., died aged 15 years; Charles F.

Charles F. Boyle attended the public schools here and graduated from the Classical High School in 1908. He then entered Clark College, from which he was graduated in 1911 with the degree of Batchelor of Arts. He was a student in the law school of Harvard University in 1911-12, and in Boston University Law School from 1912 until he graduated in 1914. He was admitted to the Mass. Bar, August 27, 1914, and since then has been practicing law in Worcester. His offices are in the Walker building. He is a member of Alhambra Council, Knights of Columbus. He is a parishioner of St. Stephen’s Roman Catholic Church. He is unmarried


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Curtis Royal Blanchard “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 186

Business man, has had a career varied by experiences that have taken him from East to West and back again to a success well worth the pride of any self-made man. Mr. Blanchard worked from the beginning with a spirit and energy which was bound to won the honest prosperity which he now enjoys.

Curtis Royal Blanchard, son of Damon Blanchard, a Baptist minister, and Mary Catherine (Burroughs) Blanchard, was born in Foster, Rhode Island, Oct 30, 1867. He received his education in the public schools of that town. Upon leaving school at the age of 18 years he went to Salida, Colorado, where he worked at ranching and mining for a time. I 1886 he returned to Foster, RI, and there he became interested in the butter making trade. The prospects of this business however were not what he had expected them to be, so in 1889 he went to Providence, RI with the intention of learning the lunch-room business. Entering into the employ of Mr. D.M. Lawler, of that city, at a salary of $8.00 per week, he had by the expiration of one year risen to the position of head cook at the wage of $14.00 per week. In 1891, Mr. Blanchard gave up this position to form a partnership with a Mr. Jackson, in the same line of business, opening a place in New Haven, Conn., with a combined capital of $750. After 8 months this partnership was dissolved, Mr. Blanchard selling his interest to his partner. The profits including sale netted for Mr. Blanchard his first $1,000. This happened when he was 25 years old. He then took a year’s vacation in Colorado, after which he returned to Conn. and entered the lunch business at Bridgeport. This was at the time of the panic of 1893. Owing to the financial conditions of the country at that time, the merchants with whom he dealt gave him 2 months to remain in business. He was amply able to remain with this venture for 9 years, during which time he saw the ruin of many of the men who had predicted his failure. In 1902 he sold this business and went to southern California for a vacation. Upon his return the following year, he opened a restaurant in Hartford, Conn. He was not so successful in this instance, so he sold his lease of premise to the Western Union Telegraph Company for $3,500, making the venture a profitable one in the end.

In 1905 Mr. Blanchard became convinced his business might prove more remunerative if he were to open a place equipped with arm chairs. Having made the acquaintance of Mr. John Porter, a man who for sometime had been occupied in the chair lunch business, and having found him to be a man of honor and integrity, Mr. Blanchard entered into partnership with him and they opened a lunch room in Worcester, at No. 364 Main Street.

At the present time (1917) they are operating 22 such lunch rooms. Six of them are located in New York City and the others are in New Haven, Hartford and Waterbury, Conn; in Fitchburg, Mass.; in Portland, Maine, and 3 in Worcester. The firm of Porter & Blanchard holds much central real estate property.

Mr. Blanchard is a member of Morning Star Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Worcester Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Hiram Council, Royal and Select Masters; and of the Mass. Consistory Knights Templar. In the First Baptist Church of Worcester, he is chairman of the committee on music. He is a director in the Worcester Chamber of Commerce, the Park Trust Company; treasurer of the Worcester County Farm Bureau, member of the Commonwealth Club ad a life member of the Worcester Country Club.

On Nov. 30, 1893, Mr. Blanchard was married to Jessie Gardner Blanchard. To them have been born 2 children: Elizabeth, born Oct. 13, 1899, attended the Seaver Street Preparatory School and the Moody School at Northfield, Mass.; Royal Irving, born Nov. 7, 1903, is now a student at Bancroft.

THE END


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Jonas Gilman Clark “History of Worcester and It’s People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 15

Founder of Clark University and College, was born in Hubbardston, Mass., Feb. 1, 1815, and died in this city May 23, 1900. His early life was devoted to the acquisition of a fortune, and his later years to the study of the needs of the country in the lines of higher scientific education, resulting in his foundation and endowment of Clark University.

He was of old colonial stock, a descendant in the 7th generation from Hugh Clark, a pioneer of Watertown, native of England, member of the famous old Artillery Company of Boston. The Clark line is: Jonas G. 7, William Smith 6, William 5, John 4, Isaac 3, John 2, and Hugh 1. John 2 Clark lived in Newton; John 4 Clark settled in Hubbardston about 1750; was a Captain and held all the important town offices; delegate to the first Provincial Congress of Mass.; furnished supplies to the Continental Army during the Revolution at Lexington. William Smith 6 Clark, born January 22, 1784, and Elizabeth (Clark) Clark, daughter of Lt. Samuel Clark, were the parents of Jonas Gilman Clark. Jonas G. Clark attended the public schools ad learned the trade of carriage making. Later he had a shop of his own, but eventually became engaged in the manufacture and sale of general hardware and household furniture, having stores in Lowell and Milford, Mass. He prospered in business, but seeing greater opportunities on the Western coast, he engaged in the California trade in partnership with George B. Wilbur, of Hubbardston, who accompanied him to Calif. in the early ‘50’s. There he laid the foundation of his great fortune through dealing in miner’s supplies. Returning East he established a business in New York City, and during the Civil War and reconstruction period made large transactions in government securities. Later he invested heavily in real estate in Boston and New York. In 1875 he sold his residence on Fifth Avenue, NY and purchased another on 72nd Street. The later house sold for half a million dollars when he came to Worcester to leave. In 1881 he built the house on Elm Street, now owned by Mrs. Edward D. Thayer and he invested in other real estate in this city, building a large business block on Main Street and another on Front Street.

He spent much of his time in later years collecting books and was keenly interested in his library. To his native town of Hubbardston, he gave a public building for a library, post office and town office, and fully filled the shelves of the library. This was the beginning of his philanthropy. He became convinced that the country needed an institution of learning where research and investigation would be encouraged to a greater degree than was possible in other American universities where the time of the professors was devoted largely to instruction. Abroad he investigated universities and institutions. In 1887 his plans were outlined and he purchased the site for Clark University. Mr. Clark was a director of the Worcester National Bank.

Mr. Clark married Oct. 6, 1836, Susan Wright of Hubbardston. They had no children. Mrs. Clark died July 4, 1904, aged 87 years.


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William Benjamin Clark “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 150

Chairman of the Directors of the Mortgage Investment Trust, for many years a wholesale produce dealer, was born in South Royalston, Mass., Dec. 15, 1849, son of Timothy and Mary A. (Sprague) Clark. He attended the public schools of his native town, left home at the age of 18 and was employed in Fitchburg with L. Sprague & Company for 2 years. From 1869 to 1871 he was in the grocery business on his own account from 1871 to 1873 in the boot and shoe business at South Framingham; from 1873 to 1879 in Westboro in the boot, shoe and clothing business, at which time he came to Worcester and engaged in the wholesale produce business, engaging as a dealer in butter and produce. His store was on Front Street for 5 years, later on Park Street. After he retired, his business was incorporated under the name of the Union Butter Company. Mr. Clark retired in 1902 and since then has resided in this city at No. 15 Westland Street.

is associated with his son and others in the Mortgage Investment Trust, of which he is a trustee and chairman of the board of directors. For many years Mr. Clark was in partnership with his brother George F. Clark, in the firm of Clark Brothers in the men’s furnishing business. The store was on Front Street.

Clark is a member of the Commonwealth Club. In politics he is Independent; in religion a free thinker. Always fond of travel, he has been able in later years to find time fr this recreation. For 10 years, during a greater part of the time, making tours to all parts of the world. Few men have seen more of the world than he.

Clark married in South Royalston, 1871, Abbie J. Murdock, who was born in Northfield, Mass., 1848, and died in this city, 1893. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have 5 children, of whom 3 are now living and 2 died in infancy. #1 Walter William; #2 Mabel Murdock, married John S. Harrington, who is now engaged in the automobile business in Springfield, Mass., and they have 2 children: John S. Jr. and William Clark Harrington; #3 Gladys Alexander, graduated from the Worcester High School and from Bedford Academy and resides with her father. Timothy Clark, father of William B. Clark, was born in 1808, son of Benjamin Clark, who was born in 1760, and died in 1853, and Susanna (Dolbear) Clark, of Templeton. This Benjamin Clark was the third Benjamin; his father, Benjamin (2) Clark was of Stoughton and Abington; married Mehitable Edson, of Bridgewater, who died in 1841, aged 88 years. Benjamin Clark, first of the name, was born in 1720, died in Abington in 1794. William B. Clark had 2 brothers, George F. and Henry Watts Clark, deceased.


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Walter William Clark “History of Worcester and Its people” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 150

Lawyer, Trustee of the Mortgage Investment Trust, was born in Westborough, Mass., Dec. 10, 1875, son of William Benjamin and Abbie J. (Murdock) Clark. His parents moved to this city when he was very young, and he attended the public schools of Worcester, graduating from the English High School in the class of 1894. After a year of post-graduate study in the high school, he entered Brown University, from which he graduated in 1899 with the degree of Ph. D. He then became a student in the Boston University Law School, continuing for 2 years, and was admitted to the Mass. Bar, Sept. 17, 1901. He began to practice in this city and has continued to the present time. His offices are at No. 416 State Mutual building.

Mr. Clark is a clerk of the Mortgage Investment Trust of Worcester and is in charge of the business. This is an express trust, having practically a corporate form of organization; in the nature of a real estate trust, the trustees holding the assets under a declaration of trust. It affords a safe and profitable form of investment for persons of moderate means. The shares are transferable. The trust invests in real estate mortgages in the city and county of Worcester, and in many cases this institution affords means for prospective builders and buyers, not to be obtained from other banking institutions on account of legislative restrictions. The Trust has been operated since 1912 and its business has shown a substantial profit, its expenses being moderate and its investments scattered among many comparatively small loans in various sections in this vicinity. Dividends are paid semi-annually and the shares are non taxable. The trustees are William B. Clark, John A. Clough and Walter W. Clark; the directors are William B. Clark, chairman, and John W. Harrington and Walter W. Clark as clerks; Herbert W. Estabrook is auditor.

Mr. Clark owns a farm in Charlton and derives much pleasure and recreation in his weekly visits there. He is a member of the Commonwealth Club, the Worcester Country Club, the Economic Club, the Worcester Automobile Club, the Tatassit Canoe Club, the Worcester Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and the Sons of Brown. In politics he is a Republican and is a member of the Worcester County Republican Club. He is unmarried and makes his home with his father at No. 15 Westland Street, Worcester.


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Capt. Leonard Clark “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 303

Prominent merchant a century ago, was born in Hubbardston, Mass. The Clark family has been very numerous and prominent in this section of the county from the early settlements.

Capt. Leonard Clark came to Worcester when a young man and made his home on Lincoln Street. Subsequently he established a general store on Burncoat Street in what is now known as Adams Square. He was living in Rutland from 1829 to 1832 but returned to ths town. When he returned after being in business for many years he moved to Shrewsbury. He was a captain in the state militia.

Capt. Clark married (1st) Nancy Heard, a daughter of Deacon Nathan Heard. She died June 24, 1818, and was buried in the old Mechanic Street Burial Ground. He married (2ND), in Worcester, April 4, 1819, Eunice Gleason.

Child by (1st) wife was Ruth Heard, born Jan. 8, 1817. Children by (2ND) wife: William Leonard; Nancy Heard born November 1821, married ? Temple of Rutland; Abigail Flagg born Jan. 5, 1824, in Worcester, married Jan. 5 1847 in Worcester to Benjamin F. Scribner, of Worcester; Almira Gleason born in Rutland on Nov. 4, 1829, married George Robbins, of Worcester; Mary Catherine born at Rutland on Aug. 7, 1832, now living at No. 21 Duxbury Road, Worcester.

William Leonard Clark, son of Capt. Leonard Clark, was born in Worcester on Dec. 29, 1819. He attended the public schools here and in Rutland, where his parents lived for several years during his boyhood. He returned to Worcester and spent practically all of his active life in the grocery and real estate business. His home was at the corner of Walnut and Maple Streets. He died in this city Dec. 16, 1898. He was educated in the public schools, and had considerable legal training and education. He was often called upon to administer estates. He was an expert accountant and for many years a bank auditor. He served for a time in the ‘70’s as assessor of the city. In the last 25 years of his life he had a real estate office at No. 9 Walnut Street. He married Lucretia Parkhurst. They had no children.


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D. William Carter “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 305

Secretary of the State Mutual Life Assurance Company, born in Rutland, Vermont, April 13, 1866, son of George H. and Melissa A. (Goodrich) Carter. His father was a native of Benson, Vermont; his mother of Wells, Vermont.

Mr. Carter received his education in the public schools of this city, graduating from high school in 1886. As a boy he entered the service of the State Mutual Life Assurance Company in 1887, receiving promotions step by step to his present position as secretary. He was elected to this office in January 1910. Mr. Carter has devoted himself exclusively to his duties and has engaged in no other business. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Economic Club, the Tatnuck Country Club, the Worcester Club and the Worcester Country Club. Mr. Carte married in Moosehead, Maine, October 7, 1898, to Lillian M. Wilson, who was born in that town in 1876, daughter of Henry I. Wilson, who died in Bangor, Maine in 1916. Mrs. Carter is active in social life, a member of the Worcester Art Museum and the Woman’s Club. Their home is at No. 61 Moore Avenue. They have no children.


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John Chamberlain “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 399

Sheet metal worker and contractor, was born in Sheldon, Vermont, April 5, 1851, son of John E. and Lucy (Bliss) Chamberlain. He received his education in the district schools; and during his youth assisted his father on the homestead. When he was 15 years old the family moved to West Enosburg, Vermont where he was employed for 6 years in his father’s woolen mill. He then went to Lowell, Mass., where he learned the trade of tinsmith, and he followed that trade in Lowell for 23 years. In 1897 he came to Worcester and found employment as a journeyman sheet metal worker. His present business was established in 1914. His shop was for a time at No. 560 Main Street; since 1916 at its present location, No. 19 Austin Street. Mr. Chamberlain is a sheet metal contractor and jobber. In politics, Mr. Chamberlain is a Republican; in religion he is a Baptist, and his wife and children are members of the Pleasant Street Baptist Church.

Mr. Chamberlain married in Lowell, Mass. to Frances Marion Waller, who was born in northern New York in 1855, daughter of Asel and Julia M. (Sweet) Waller. Her father was a grocer. Both parents are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Chamberlain had 3 children: #1 Fred J., traveling salesman for the Fairbanks Company, manufacturers of heavy hardware, resides in Worcester, married Mashie Parkhurst and has 2 children: Phyllis and Stanley; #2 Villa M., married Philip J. Adams, of Worcester, they have 2 children; #3 Lottie lives with parents.

John E. Chamberlain, father of John A. was born in Vermont, was a farmer in Sheldon, manufacturing in Enosburg; died in Glover, Vermont. He married Lucy Bliss, who was born in Fairfield, Vermont and died at West Enosburg, Vermont at the age of 44 years. They had 6 children, of whom John A. is the only survivor. Four of their children were as follows: Sabina, married Asa Chamberlain and left 1 daughter, Lucy. Sarah married Jay N. Groves, and left 3 children. Benjamin R., married and left 5 children. Lucy, married Alvin J. Hoskins, and left 3 children.


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Barry Colvin Crawford “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 236

Son of William Henry Crawford, was born in Worcester, Sept. 23, 1883. He attended the public schools of this city and after graduating from high school entered Amherst College were he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1906. He was for a number of years with the firm of Crawford & Company, of which his father was the senior partner. Since 1909 he has been with the Aetna Hosiery Company as assistant treasurer. He is a member of the Worcester Country Club and the Commonwealth Club. He married Nellie C. Stone, Sept. 14, 1909.


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William Henry Crawford “History of Worcester and Its People: by Charles Nutt; volume 3 page 235

Senior partner of the firm of Crawford & Company, was born in Oxford, May 7, 1840, son of Elias B. and Jane Thankful (Taft) Crawford. His father was born in Oakham, Nov. 19, 1810, and educated there in the public schools, but at the age of 21 engaged in the manufacture of thread in Oxford under the firm name of DeWitt, Campbell & Company. After the mill was burned in 1842, Stearns DeWitt sold to Elias B. Crawford the remains of the plant and other real estate, and Mr. Crawford resumed the manufacture of thread soon afterward. In 1854, after selling his business to Charles L. Harding, he occupied the basement of the Sigourney Mill in the manufacture of twine; later he moved to Putnam, Conn., and manufactured cotton goods; then to Stafford, Conn. where he made woolens; and finally to Wilkinsonville, Mass. where he had a woolen mill, which he sold in 1888 to Moses Taft, of Uxbridge, and retired, making his home in Worcester with his daughter, Mrs. Caleb Colvin. He died here Jan. 29, 1890. He was a prominent and useful citizen, serving the town of Oxford as assessor and highway commissioner . His wife was a daughter of Otis Taft, granddaughter of Silas Taft; and descendant of Robert Taft, the immigrant, who was also the progenitor of President William H. Taft.

James Crawford, grandfather of William Henry Crawford, was born in Oakham, Aug. 11, 1775; was a gunsmith by trade; was employed many years in the United States Arsenal at Albany, NY and died there Feb. 5, 1814. He married in March 1800 to Molly Butler, daughter of John and Grace Butler.

William Crawford, father of James Crawford, was born in Rutland, Mass., Oct 23, 1745, and removed to Oakham when 5 years old; he learned the trade of clock making and became especially skilled and well known. He was a soldier in the Revolution in 1777, and afterwards a captain in the militia. He married Mary Henderson, daughter of James and Sarah Henderson.

Alexander Crawford, father of William Crawford, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland in 1713 and was but a year old when the family came to this country; was a pioneer farmer in Rutland, removing to Rutland West Wing, now Oakham, in 1750 and died there Oct. 11, 1793; he married Elizabeth Crawford, who died April 27, 1772, aged 62 years, a native of Magherafelt, Londonderry County, Ireland, and related to the Crafords who settled early in Londonderry, New Hampshire.

Aaron Crawford, father of Alexander Crawford, was the pioneer, came to this country in 1713, and lived for a few years in Boston; was one of the earliest settlers of Rutland. He was born in County Tyrone, Ireland in 1677; married Agnes Wilson in the parish of Capy, County Tyrone and they had 3 sons, Samuel, John and Alexander before coming to this country. He died in Rutland August 6, 1754, and she died there December 10, 1760.

William Henry Crawford received his education in the Oxford schools. At the age of 18 he went to Schraulenburg, New Jersey and taught school for 2 years. In 1860 he entered the employ of Sumner Pratt, of Worcester, a dealer in mill supplies. After a year he took a course in Wesleyan Academy at Wilbraham, and then returned to the employ of Mr. Pratt as a clerk. In 1870 he was admitted to partnership under the firm name of Sumner Pratt & Company. The store was then at No. 22 Front Street. Mr. Crawford became the senior partner, Dec. 1, 1896, and John T. Brierly was admitted to the firm, the present name of the concern, Crawford & Company, being then assumed. The business was moved to Nos. 16 & 17 Mechanic Street, April 1, 1900, and remained there until the building was destroyed by fire, March 17, 1905. Since then the firm has occupied quarters at Nos. 663 & 665 Main Street.

Mr. Crawford attended Plymouth Congregational Church and for a number of years served on its board of assessors. In politics he was a Republican, active in party affairs and often a delegate to nominating conventions. In 1884 and 1885 he was a member of the Common Council, and for 3 years member of the Worcester School Committee. He was made a Mason, Oct. 14, 1872 in Montacute Lodge, and continued a member of the Lodge to the end of his life. He was a director of the old Citizen’s National Bank. His home was at No. 11 Massachusetts Avenue. Mr. Crawford married June 8, 1865 at Palmer to Mary Ann Moore, a daughter of Henry A. and Elmira (Ruggles) Moore of Palmer. Her father was a scythe maker.

Children born in Worcester: #1 Lillian Moore, born May 4, 1868, teacher for many years in the Classical High School of Worcester #2 Mabel Jane, born Oct. 17, 1870, married Frank H. Howland, a prominent dentist of Worcester #3 Anna Cutler, born June 3, 1873 #4 Harry Colvin.


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Charles Elton Ayers History of Worcester and Its People by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 272

Physician, surgeon, was born in Taunton, Mass., July 11, 1889. He attended the public schools of his native city, completing the course in the grammar school in 1904 and graduating from the Taunton High School in 1908. He then became a student in Tufts Medical School, Boston, and graduated in 1912 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. During the next year and half he was an intern in the Worcester City Hospital. From here he went to the Carney Hospital in Boston in the orthopedic service and continued until January, 1915. He began to practice in Worcester, Feb. 8, 1915, and is making a specialty of orthopedic surgery, in which he has had a long training. He is the only doctor of the city devoting himself exclusively to this branch of surgery. His offices were in the Central Exchange building, but are now at No. 28 Pleasant Street. John Bernard Ayers, father of Dr. Charles E. Ayers, was born in Charlotteville, Prince Edward Island, in 1865. He is at present at the head of the burnishing department of the Reed & Barton Silver Works in Taunton. He married Delia Crowley, who was born in Ireland, coming to this country at the age of 16 and locating with her family in Taunton, where she was married. Dr. Ayers was their only child. Peter Ayers, grandfather of Dr. Ayers, was also a native of Prince Edward Island; a farmer married twice and had a family of 14 children; all of whom lived to maturity.

THE END


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Daniel Patrick Callahan History of Worcester and Its People by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 335

Lawyer, formerly a member of the school committee for 9 years, trustee of the Boys Trade School, was born in Worcester, April 16, 1881, son of Daniel and Mary A. (Dooley) Callahan. His father was a native of County Cork, Ireland, and came to this country with his parents when he was 4 years old. He was a moulder by trade, employed during most of his active life in Worcester foundries. He retired some years ago and is living in Worcester. His mother was born in Limerick, Ireland, and also came when a child with her parents to Worcester. They have had, besides Daniel, 2 other children: John F., a machinist of Worcester, and Mary, who died in infancy.

Daniel P. Callahan attended the Worcester public schools and graduated from the Classical High School in the class of 1898, after another year of post-graduate work in this school, he entered Holy Cross College, from which he was a graduate with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1902. In 1904 he received the degree of Master of Arts from Holy Cross College. He studied law in the Catholic University of America at Washington, D.C., receiving his degree of LL,B. in 1905. He was admitted to the Massachusetts bar, Aug. 28, 1905, and immediately afterward began to practice in Worcester. His offices are at 900 Slater building, No. 390 Main Street. Mr. Callahan not only enjoys a lucrative civil practice, but has taken an active part in many prominent criminal trials, notably that of the Varney Murder Case, in which he was counsel for the defendant, Harriet A.Varney.

Mr. Callahan has taken a leading part in the local Democratic organization and is well known in his party throughout the State. He served on the school committee from 1905 to 1914, inclusive, and was for a term of years trustee of the Worcester Boys Trade School. He has been particularly interested in the subject of education. His principal recreation is baseball, in which he is something of an expert. He is a member of the Washington Social Club; Alhambra Council, Knights of Columbus; Worcester County Bar Assoc.; Mass. Bar Assoc.; American Bar Assoc.; the Holy Cross Club, of which he is secretary, and a communicant of St. Bernard’s Roman Catholic Church.

Mr. Callahan married, at Conimicut, RI, Nov. 25, 1915, Mary M. Moriarty, who was born in Valley Falls, RI., Jan. 14, 1880, daughter of John and Katherine (Conboy) Moriarty, both of whom are living in Rhode Island. Mr. and Mrs. Callahan have 1 child, Daniel Patrick Jr., born May 5, 1917.

THE END


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Frederick Herbert Chamberlain History of Worcester and its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 113

Judge of Probate and Insolvency of Worcester County, was born in Worcester, Dec. 27, 1862, son of Ephraim Fay and Maria Allen (McFarland) Chamberlain. His father was born in Westborough, Aug. 18, 1811,son of Jason and Betsey (Burnap) Chamberlain; married at Worcester, July 13, 1847, and afterward lived in the old homestead of his wife’s family on Pleasant Street at what is now called Lenox. Jason Chamberlain was a farmer in Westborough, son of Ebenezer Chamberlain and a descendant of William Chamberlain, the immigrant ancestor, who was born in England and settled before 1648 in Woburn, removing later to Billerica, where he died May 31, 1706, aged 86 years. Through his mother, Judge Chamberlain is descended from many of the early families of Worcester.

During his youth Judge Chamberlain attended the district schools and like other sons of farmers, found his spare time well occupied with the work of the farm. He graduated in 1878 from Worcester High School and after a few years of farming entered the Harvard Law School, from which he graduated in 1886 wth the degree of Bachelor of Laws. During the next year and a half, following his admission to the bar and graduation from th law school, he was employed in the law offices of Kent & Dewey. Then he engaged in the practice of his profession, sharing offices with Willis E. Sibley in the Walker building. He was active at that time in the Worcester Agricultural Society interested in agriculture and in bettering conditions of the farmers in this section, having a wide acquaintance among the farmers of the county, and he became the logical choice of the Agricultural Society for secretary in 1891. The secretary of this society is its actual executive charged with a multitude of responsible duties, and especially during the months preceding and following the annual exhibitions his office is a place of great activity. This work proved congenial to Judge Chamberlain and the members of the society were well pleased with his administration of affairs, but he resigned in 1893, after 2years, to accept the office of assistant registrar of probate.

During the years following he had much to do with improving the system, arranging the records and instructing subordinates. Anyone familiar with probate offices in New England knows that for many years Worcester has had the most efficient offices and clerks. From the registrars to the youngest clerks there has been continuously a spirit of earnestness and diligence not usually found in public offices, a spirit due in part to the careful selection of assistants, the retention of fit and experienced men and the training given new subordinates. Judge Chamberlain brought about a greater degree of efficiency at a time when the work of the office was increasing rapidly.

A proper recognition of his service of 14 years in the registry was his appointment as judge, when the Legislature created an additional judgeship in the county. At that time Judge William T. Forbes was hardpressed by the great volume of business in the court, and from time to time it had been necessary to call upon various other probate judges for assistance to hear cases and perform routine work, Governor Curtis Guild appointed Mr. Chamberlain, June 5, 1907 and he has filled the office since that time with dignity and distinction. His training as a lawyer and in the registrar’s office gave him the best possible preparation for the duties of his present position. But perhaps more important and contributing more to his high reputation as a probate judge are his natural gifts of common sense, his keenness in reading human character and in sifting out the truth in testimony; a personality that wins confidence and invites frankness; and above all his habits of industry ad thoroughness in detail. Judge Chamberlain, as every lawyer knows, never lets his work get ahead of him. He has a retentive memory and an analytic mind.

Judge Chamberlain is a trustee of the Worcester County Institution of Savings; a member of the Worcester Agricultural Society; the Worcester County Horticultural Society; Worcester Grange, Patrons of Husbandry; the Worcester County Mechanics Association; the Tatnuck Country Club and the Economic Club of Worcester. He is also a member of Athelstan Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; of Eureka Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Hiram Council, Royal and Select Masters and of Worcester County Commandery, Knights Templar. In politics he has always been a Republican and in religion a Congregationalist and attending the Old South Church. He is unmarried.

Judge Chamberlain has retained the old mansion house on the homestead and has always resided there, but te remainder of the place has undergone a transformation in the past 5 years from hay fields and orchards to one of the finest residence parks of the city, known as Lenox.


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William Henry Dexter History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 20

Merchant, philanthropist, was born January 11, 1823 at Charlton, and died January 20, 1912, son of John Bradford and Lucinda (McIntire) Dexter.

He attended the Charlton public schools, at the age of 14 entered his father’s employ as a clerk in the country store. He then worked at Burrillville, Rhode Island as a clerk until he was 17, when he returned to work for his father again. The following year he became clerk in a general merchandise house in Boston. In 1846 he started business for himself, having a thorough knowledge of business and sufficient capital. His store was located on Southbridge Street, Worcester, and was the first grocery store not located on Main Street. After 5 years of flourishing business, he entered the wholesale and retail flour and grain business, with headquarters at the corner of Main and Pleasant Streets, and there he laid the foundation of his fortune. Three years later he built a block at Franklin Square. Here he built up a very successful business. He had another block on the corner of Main and Allan Court.

Mr Dexter was interested in his younger days in city affairs, and from 1873 to 1878 was a member of the Common Council, and for 3 years was on the school board. He was one of the organizers of the First National Bank, which was amalgamated with the Worcester Bank and Trust Company, and he was a director for 24 years, and vice president for 2 years.

Mr Dexter is best known for his philanthropy. Since 1874 he has contributed generously to the funds of Worcester Academy, which he has been trustee and treasurer. He gave the building named for him, Dexter Hall, in 1892, and has given liberally to the Baptist Church. He gave his native town Dexter Memorial Building, in which its library and town hall are located.

Mr. Dexter married Feb. 2, 1848, at Thompson, Conn., Eliza Adeline Foss, born August 3, 1824, daughter of Phineas and Dorothy (Jenkins) Foss. They had one child: Carrie Eliza, born April 6, 1852 at Worcester, and died August 12, 1852. Mrs. Dexter died January 20, 1907 at Worcester. Mrs. Dexter when a young girl, being of an independent spirit and wishing to gain an education and support herself, worked in a mill at Saco, Maine, and studied nights, winning 1st prize for scholarship. A desire to have the girls of her native State have the advantages of education not to be had wen she was a girl, impelled Mrs. Dexter to give the trustees of Colby University, Waterville, Maine a hall known as Foss Hall; to be used by he Maine girls attending the University. His line of ancestry is: John Bradford, Charles, John, Samuel, John, John, John, Richard, immigrant ancestor born in England about 1606.


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Ralph Landers Morgan “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 171

Consulting engineer, was born in Worcester, Sept. 5, 1872, son of Charles H. and Rebecca (Beagary) Morgan. Ralph L. Morgan received his education in the Worcester public schools, the Worcester Academy and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He began his career in business in the employ of the exporting firm of Flint, Eddy & Company, of New York City. He was president of the Morgan Motor Company of Worcester, manufacturing a motor truck with an engine of his design. He was for a year or more manager of the automobile department of the American Bicycle Company of Toledo, Ohio. Since 1905 he has followed his profession in Worcester as consulting engineer. Mr. Morgan has taken out a number of valuable patents. His offices are at No. 393 Main Street. In politics he is a Republican; in religion he is a Congregationalist, a member of Plymouth Church. He is a member of the Worcester Club, the Tatnuck Country Club, the Quinsigamond Boat Club, the Worcester County Fish and Game Association, the Engineers Club of New York, the Maine Coast Club, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society of Automobile Engineers.

Mr. Morgan married in Worcester, Oct. 12, 1897 to Alice Sawyer, who was born in Worcester, a daughter of William H. and Fannie (Wells) Sawyer. They had 2 children: Myles, born in Worcester, October 6, 1899; and Weld, born in Worcester, November 14, 1904. Mrs. Morgan is a member of the Worcester Woman’s Club. Their home is at No. 96 William Street.


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Frank Charles Martin “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 230

Dentist, was born in North Grafton, Mass., Jan. 30, 1879,son of Charles and Delia (La Porte) Martin. He attended the public schools there, completing the course in the grammar school in 1894. During the following 5 years he was employed in the shoe factory of J.S. Nelson & Son at N. Grafton. He began to study dentistry in Worcester in 1899, and 2 years later became a student in the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, graduating in 1904 with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. In the same year he began to practice in Worcester at No. 419 Main Street but since 1918 he has had offices at No. 28 Pleasant Street. Dr. Martin’s recreations are baseball, golf, and motoring.

Dr. Martin married Sept. 11, 1907, at Gardiner, Maine, to Virginia S. Sawyer, born at Gardiner, daughter of Roscoe O. and Sarah (Duffy) Sawyer. Her father is now living at Stockton Springs, Maine, and is a shipper for the St. John’s Lumber Company; he is a veteran of the Civil War; her mother died in October 1917. Mrs. Martin is descended from many of the early settlers of Maine and Massachusetts.

Charles Martin, father of Dr. Martin was born in Vermont, August 30, 1841 and died in North Grafton, Nov. 1, 1917. He was a shoemaker by trade, but had been retired since 1904. He married Delia La Porte, who was born in St. Alexandria, Canada, March 15, 1848, and is now living in North Grafton. They had 9 children:

1) Ida, who married David Benoit of N. Grafton

2) Rose, of Brockton

3) Edward, of Brockton, assistant superintendent of the W.L. Douglas factory

4) William, of N. Grafton, shoe dealer

5) Cornelia, married Moses Beauregard of North Grafton

6) Dr. Frank C.

7) Dr. Henry, also a dentist, practicing at No. 184 Front Street, Worcester; living in N. Grafton

8) Mabel, of Brockton

9) Isabel, married Thomas B. Pellett of N. Grafton

Dr. and Mrs. Martin reside at No. 722 Pleasant Street. Mrs. Martin is a member of the Colonel Timothy Bigelow Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. She is a descendent of Douglas Perley, one of the founders of the town of Winchendon. They have no children.


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Peleg Emory Aldrich “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 169

Lawyer, mayor in 1862, Justice of the Superior Court, was born in New Salem, Mass., July 24, 1813, and died in Worcester, March 14, 1895, son of Peleg and Salley (Crosett) Aldrich. He descended from the pioneer George Aldrich, who was born in England; came with the first settlers and founders of Dorchester before 1636, died in 1682 at Mendon, were his descendants have been numerous and prominent.

Peleg E. Aldrich received his education in the public schools of his native town and at Shelbourne Falls Academy of Massachusetts. In the autumn of 1837 he taught school in Virginia and continued as a teacher in that state until 1842, continuing his studies in the Classics, mathematics and reading law. In 1842 and 1843 he was a student in the Dane Law School of Harvard University. He returned to Virginia, however, to fulfill an engagement in the school in which he had previously been a teacher, and he was admitted to the bar in Virginia in 1845. Returning to Mass. soon afterwards, he became a law student in the offices of Chapman, Ashman & Norton, of Springfield and six months later was admitted to the bar in that city. In December 1846 he opened an office in Barre and practiced there for 7 years. During that period he became editor and afterwards owner of the old “Barre Patriot” and was editor and publisher about 3 years. He represented Barre in the State Constitutional Convention in 1853. In May of 1853 he was appointed by Governor Clifford district attorney for the Middle District. Three years later, he was elected to this office, re-elected and served for 12 years in all, declining another term.

While in Barre he was for 2 years in partnership with N.F. Bryant, Esq. In the spring of 1854 he left Barre and opened an office in Worcester. In January of 1855 he formed a partnership with Hon. Peter C. Bacon, which continued until Mr. Aldrich was appointed judge in October 1873. From 1873 to the time of his death he was justice of the Superior Court.

Not only as a successful lawyer and eminent jurist was Judge Aldrich distinguished. He was active in public life after coming to Worcester and was elected Mayor in 1861, serving in 1862, but declining another term. In politics he was a Republican. The Civil War furnished difficult problems during his administration. He gave able and loyal support to the government in raising and equipping troops. He was a representative in the General Court in 1866 and 1867. He was appointed by Governor William Clafin a member of the State Board of Health at the time it was organized in 1870 and he served until he was elevated to the bench.

He was a member of the American Antiquarian Society, and a frequent contributor to its proceedings. He was also a member of the Historical Society of Virginia. His work on equity, published in 1888, was recognized as an authority on the subject. In 1866 he received from Amherst College the degree of Doctor of Laws. He was president of the board of trustees of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

Mr. Aldrich married in 1850, Sarah Woods, who was born in Barre, June 5, 1824 and died in Worcester, Dec. 25, 1897, a daughter of Harding P. and Sarah Woods. They had 5 children: Caroline V., widow of William B. Durant, of Cambridge; Henrietta G., widow of William T. Wardwell, of Newton; Josephine C., lives in Worcester; Charles F. and Edward, who died in Worcester, July 18, 1905.


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Charles Francis Aldrich “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 170

Referee in bankruptcy, was born in Worcester, Dec. 8, 1858, son of Hon. Peleg Emory and Sarah (Woods) Aldrich. He attended the public schools, graduating from the Worcester High School in the class of 1874, completing his preparation for college in the Highland Military Academy. He entered Yale College, from which he was graduated in 1879 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then studied law in the office of Peter C. Bacon, of Worcester for 2 years, followed by a year at the Harvard Law School. In 1882 he was admitted to the Mass. Bar.

After leaving the law school he was for one year secretary of U.S. Senator George F. Hoar. In 1883 he opened a law office in the old post office building on Pearl Street, later moving to Nos. 601-602 State Mutual building of Worcester and practiced there. Since 1898 he has been referee in bankruptcy, the first to hold this office. This office is judicial under the federal laws and he has jurisdiction of all bankruptcy cases in Worcester County. In politics he is a Republican. In 1887 and 1888 he served in the common council.

In his early life Dr. Aldrich was an athlete and he has not lost interest in sports. He was coxswain of the Yale University crew in 1876,1877 and 1878, and rowed in single scull races. He is member of the Quinsigamond Boat Club; the Grafton Country Club; the University Club of New York.

He is unmarried.


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Frederick S. Converse History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt, Volume 3 page 444

Well known contractor and business man of Worcester, was born Aug. 5, 1849, and died May 13, 1901 in Worcester, son of Brigham and Elizabeth (Putnam) Converse. His father, likewise, was a contractor and owner of the former Putnam Quarry on Mill Stone Hill nearby. Frederick S. Converse was educated in the public schools of his native city and Worcester Academy. After completing his education he became associated in business with his father and succeeded in the management of affairs when his father died, and he in turn continued its operation as long as he lived. He was interested in horses and his knowledge of equestrianism gave him high position amongst the fancies here. An upright and highly esteemed citizen, his demise was keenly felt by all those who knew him. In politics he was a staunch Republican, and always interested in the welfare and the progressing issues of the Nation, State, County and City.

Mr. Converse married Sept. 26, 1872 to Mary C. Bond, of Worcester, daughter of Joseph E. and Julia Anne (Barber) Bond, well known residents of Worcester and old Bolyston, Mass. Julia Anne (Barber) Bond’s mother was of the old Barber family of Worcester. Mrs. Converse still resides at No. 9 Clayton Street and is quite active in various affairs. She is a member of the Naomi Rebekah Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Pocohantas Club and the 20th Century Club. Mr. and Mrs. Converse’s children were: Clara A.; Myron F.; Eva A.; Walter H.; Minnie F.; Mabel L.; and Fannie B., all are deceased except for Myron F., of whom further.


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Myron F. Converse “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 444

Banker and prominent citizen, son of Frederick S. and Mary C. (Bond) Converse, was born Nov. 27, 1876, in Worcester. He was educated in the public schools of his native city. After completing his education he entered the employ of the Worcester Five Cents Savings Bamk, May 14, 1894, in a minor position. Since then he served in various capacities until he became treasurer, the responsible office he now holds. Mr. Converse has shown himself to be quite able and his executive ability is recognized in other important positions he holds outside of his banking institution, being clerk and treasurer of the Worcester County Mechanics’ Association, trustee of the Trust Funds of the City of Worcester, member of the Retirement Board of Worcester County, and in social life, not only is he a member but has served officially in some of the leading clubs. Of these he is a member of the Worcester Club and its treasurer; Worcester Country Club, of which he as treasurer for a number of years; the Tatnuck Country Club; chairman of the finance committee and one of the trustees of the Worcester County Horticultural Society. He is affiliated as a member with the Masons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he is prominent, and a director in the Odd Fellows Charitable Association and formerly its treasurer. In religion he attends the Pleasant Street Baptist Church, and here too, he was called upon to serve as its treasurer. Mr. Converse is decidedly interested in all political issues and feels it is a priviledge and duty of all citizens to make use of the franchise, and in this he is a firm believer in the Republican party. During the Great War he has been most patriotic and a leader in the Liberty Loan, Red Cross and United War Work campaigns.


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Samuel Elbridge Hildreth “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 139

Mayor, manufacturer, was born at Brattleboro, Vermont, Dec. 8, 1829, and died in Worcester, June 25, 1893, son of Royal and Adaline (Gerry) Hildreth.

After the death of his father, when he was but 5 years old, he went to live with an Aunt in Conn., remaining there until he was 16 and attending the public schools. He then came to Worcester and went to work in a printing office. After 6 months, however, he entered the employ of Alexander and Sewall Thayer in the old Court Mills and learned the trade of machinist. Afterward he worked for Samuel Flagg until 1854, when the Merrifield building in which the shop was located was destroyed by fire. Then came a period of nearly 20 years in the employ of the late L.W. Pond. In this business, which grew to be one of the largest in the country in its field, Mr. Hildreth was an important factor. His mechanical ability was constantly in evidence in improvement in the machinery manufactured. He secured various patents on drills and planers. He rose to positions of greater responsibility from time to time, becoming foreman and eventually superintendent. In May, 1873, he engaged in a business on his own account, buying a third interest in the business of P. Blaisdell & Company, and in this firm he continued active to the end of his life. The company manufactured machine tools in large variety and took rank among the foremost in that line of business. At the time of his death his partners were John P. Jones and Enoch Earle. Mr. Hildreth was not only a leader in the industrial life of the city, but one of the most prominent men in public life. In 1866 he began his service to the city government as common councilman from Ward 3. During the following years he was a member of the Board of Alderman. In 1872 he represented the city in General Court. He was an active and consistent Republican in politics and as candidate of his party was elected in 1882 Mayor of the city of Worcester. In his administration he manifested the same practical sense which had characterized the conduct of his own business and retired from office with an enviable record. During his administration the Millbury Street school house was built at a cost of $31,503 and the Winslow Street school enlarged at a cost of $16,413. Tatnuck Brook was taken for an additional water supply and the work completed at a cost of $223,574, making the total cost of the water system to that date $1,603,988. The Pine Meadow sewer was completed at a cost of $15,000. The city purchased the first steam roller for use in the highway department. Electric lights were first used in the streets. Police station No. 2 was established in the “Island” district. Mr. Hildreth was elected to the school committee from Ward 7 in 1887 and continued to hold this office until he died. His devotion and efficient service in this office were exemplary. To the subject of manual training, he devoted himself with characteristic energy and marked success.

He was a member of the Worcester County Mechanics’ Association and in 1885-86, its president; of the Worcester Society of Antiquity; the Brigade Club and of the Order of United American Workmen. He was a member of the local Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and had taken 32 degrees in the Scottish Rite Masonry, being a member of the Blue Lodge, chapter, council and commandery in Worcester and various other Masonic bodies in Boston. He was a member of the Piedmont Congregational Church. Mr. Hildreth married in 1852, Matilda Coleman Howe, daughter of William B. Howe. Of three children, but one survived infancy, Charles Elbridge.


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Charles Elbridge Hildreth “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 140

President and general manager of the Whitcomb-Blaisdell Machine Tool Company, was born in Worcester, Oct. 19, 1866, son of Samuel Elbridge and Matilda Coleman (Howe) Hildreth. He attended the Woodland Street public school and graduated from Classical High School in 1888, president of his class. He was president of the Sumner Club, the high school debating society, for 2 years. He entered Amherst College, from which he graduated in the class of 1892. While in college he sang in the Glee Club and in the quartet in the college choir. He was a member of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. In his senior year he was manager of the “Amherst Student”. He won the Kellogg prize in the declamation contest in his sophomore year and the second prize in the Hyde contest in oratory in his senior year. At commencement he was chairman of the committee on committees. After graduating he learned the trade of machinist in the shops of his father’s firm, P. Blasdell & Company. He studied drafting for 6 months under the instruction of A.M. Powell, of the Woodward-Powell Planer Company. He succeeded to the interests of his father. In 1905 he bought the shares of his partners and consolidated the business with that of the Whitcomb Manufacturing Company and the Whitcomb Foundry Company. In October of the same year the Draper Machine Tool Company was also absorbed. The new corporation was called the Whitcomb-Blaisdell Machine Tool Company. A.W. Whitcomb was president; Mr. Hildreth , vice president and treasurer. In October 1913, he purchased the interests of Mr. Whitcomb and became president and general manager. The capitalization is $350,000. The company employs 500 hands and ranks among the leading manufacturers of lathes and planes in this country.

Mr. Hildreth was president of the Worcester High School Alumni Association after leaving college. He was secretary and later president of the Worcester Metal Trades Assoc. He was formerly a member of the National Council of the National Metal Trades Assoc. He is the general manager of the National Machine Tool Builder’s Assoc., a director of the Worcester Electric Light Company, trustee of the Worcester Five Cents Savings Bank, a member of the Worcester Mechanics’ Assoc., and of the Chamber of Commerce, serving on the board of directors, and was formerly a director of the Board of Trade, and of the YMCA.

He is a member of the Worcester Country Club, the Worcester Automobile Club, of which he was the president; the Worcester Golf Club, of which he was president for 5 years, Quinsigamond Lodge, Free & Accepted Masons; Eureka Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; and Worcester County Commandery, Knights Templar. He served 3 years, 1892-96, inthe State Militia, the Worcester Light Infantry. He was for a number of years superintendent of the Sunday school of Piedmont Congregational Church. In politics he is a Republican and has served his party in the city committee and as a delegate to many state and other nominating conventions.

Mr. Hildreth married Sept. 19, 1894, Sarah Eugenia Hill, born Dec. 23, 1868, daughter of William Benjamin and Sarah Elizabeth (Carlisle) Hill, of Boston. Her father was treasurer of the National Manufacturing Company of Worcester. Mr. and Mrs. Hildreth’s children were:

1) Dorothy, born Oct. 3, 1895

2) Carlisle Elbridge, born Dec. 12, 1896, enlisted for the War in the US Navy

3) Helen Hill, born Feb. 28, 1903

4) Samuel Gordon, born July 30, 1907


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Samuel Richardson Heywood “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 266

Founder of the Heywood Boot & Shoe Company, was born in Princeton, Nov. 14, 1821, and died in Worcester May 27, 1913. He was a son of Ezra and Dorcas (Roper) Hoar, and descended in both paternal and maternal lines from many of the pioneer English settlers of New England. His father, Ezra Hoar, was a son of Capt. Stephen Hoar, of Concord. The name of the family was changed by act of the Legislature, May 10, 1848. Samuel R. Heywood was one of 9 children. He was raised on a farm and attended the district schools of his native town. For 2 terms he attended the Westminster Academy, paying his own way, while a student. At the age of 20 he entered the employ of E.D. & E.A. Goodnow, of Princeton, manufacturers of boots and shoes, and owners of a general store. In August, 1848, he started in business for himself, as senior partner in the firm Heywood & Warren, general merchants in Hubbardston. Three years later he became sole proprietor of the business, which he conducted until January 1855, when he came to Worcester, where he made his home afterward to the end of his life. Here he became a partner of Edward A. Goodnow under the firm name of Goodnow & Heywood, in the wholesale and retail boot and shoe trade. In the following year the firm was dissolved. Mr. Heywood taking the retail business which he conducted until 1864. He began to manufacture boots and shoes in 1864, as partner of C.C. Houghton in the firm name of Houghton & Heywood, continuing for 3 years. From 1867 to 1873 Mr. Heywood continued to make boots and shoes, then he admitted to partnership Oscar Phillips and the business continued under the name of S.R. Heywood and Company.

In 1879 the factory on Winter Street was erected and at that time was one of the largest and best equipped in the country. From time to time additions have been made to the original building. In 1884 the business was incorporated under the present, The Heywood Boot and Shoe Company, Mr. Heywood being president; Frank E. Heywood, vice president; Oscar Phillips, treasurer. In 1889 Mr. Phillips retired and was succeeded by Frank E. Haywood, after whose death, in 1899, Albert S. Heywood became vice president and treasurer, and Mr. Newell, assistant treasurer. These were the offices associated with president Heywood until the time of his death. The factory was enlarged in 1894, 1907 and 1913, more than doubling the capacity of the factory. During 1899 the manufacture of boots was abandoned and since then the company has manufactured only high-grade shoes.

Mr. Heywood was a director of the Central National Bank from 1865 to 1903; from 1864, when the People’s Bank was founded, to July 1884, he was trustee and member of the finance committee, and from that time until he died he was it’s president. He was for many years a director of the Cotton and Woolen Mutual Insurance Company of Boston. Public spirited and well informed, he took a keen interest in public affairs. He cast his first vote for James G. Birney, the Free Soil candidate for president, and in 1856 took part in the organization of the Republican Party, which he ever afterwards supported. He was a member of the Common Council 1859, 1873, ad 1874, and of the board of alderman in 1860 and 1861, and president of the council in 1874. He was representative to the General Court in 1875, 76, and 1877, and served on the committee on railroads during both terms. He was one of the active supporters of Hon. George F. Hoar and materially assisted in his election for the first time to the U.S. Senate. In 1877 he was appointed as trustee of the State Reform School at Westborough and he filled this office until 1888 by successive re-appointments. He was a generous supporter of the various benevolent societies of the city. He was a member of the Salem Street Congregational Church and later one of the founders of Plymouth Church.

Worcester owes a great debt to Samuel R. Heywood not only because he built here a great industry that continues to benefit thousands of her citizens, but because of his sterling character and example. His contributions in service to municipal government, his benefactions to church and charity; his influence and aid in every movement designed to benefit the people of this city. Until the last year of his life, long after he had reached the age of 90, his mind as alert as ever and he attended to his office duties regularly. He was in business for 70 years and more, if the years of his clerkship are counted.

Mr. Heywood married in Chelsea, June 6, 1856, Harriet Butler Milliken, born Aug. 27, 1828, daughter of Zachariah T. and Anne B. Milliken, of Chelsea, both natives of Franklin County, Maine. Their children were:

1) George Ezra, born Jan. 26, 1859, died young

2) Frank Everett, of whom later

3) Caroline Louise, born Dec. 2, 1862, died Sept. 16, 1866

4) Henrietta Butler, born May 15, 1865, died Nov. 25, 1868

5) Albert Samuel

THE END


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Frank Everett Heywood “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 267

Vice president and treasurer of the Heywood Boot & Shoe Company, was born April 21, 1860, died in Worcester, in October 1899, son of Samuel R. and Hariett Butler (Milliken) Heywood. He attended the public schools here, graduating from the Classical High School in 1877, and from the seminary at Easthampton in 1878. He then entered Harvard College, graduating in 1882 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Immediately after leaving college he became associated in business with his father in the firm of S.R. Heywood and Company, and in 1884, when the business was incorporated, he became vice president and treasurer, serving until the time of his death. He was a man of excellent business ability, and exemplary character. He was a director of the Citizens National Bank.

Mr. Heywood married, Dec. 18, 1884, Harriet Dodd Jennings, born Dec. 4, 1864, daughter of Horace N. and Marie (Dodd) Jennings, of East Orange, New Jersey. His widow resides at No. 7 Academy Street, Worcester. Their children were:

1) Chester Dodd, born Oct. 1, 1887, graduate of Williams College, now assistant treasurer of the company, recently commissioned Captain after a course of training at Fort Oglethorpe, GA, and is now a reserve officer in the U.S. Army

2) Philip Butler, born March 24, 1889, graduate of Williams College, now assistant purchasing agent with Crompton Knowles Company 3) Florence Blair, born May 18, 1893 4) Richard, born May 8, 1897, with the American Ambulance in France


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Albert Samuel Heywood “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 267

President of the Heywood Boot and Shoe Company, was born in Worcester, May 31, 1867, son of Samuel R. and Harriet Butler (Milliken) Heywood. He attended the public schools of this city and prepared for college in the high school and Worcester Academy. He became a student in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which he graduated in the class of 1892.

He intended to follow the profession of electrical engineering and was winning distinction in the service of the General Electric Company of New York, when the death of his brother caused him to give up his career in that field and came to the assistance of his father in the great business he had established here. He resigned his position, Jan. 1, 1900, to become vice president of the Heywood Boot & Shoe Company. From time to time he took upon his shoulders the burdens of business borne for so many years by his father. He became treasurer a well as vice president and manager. The offices of the corporation since the death of the founders have been: President, Albert S. Heywood; vice president and treasurer, Bertram S. Newell; assistant treasurer, Chester D. Heywood, son of Frank E. Heywood. Under the administrations of Albert S. Heywood the reputation of the Heywood Shoe has been maintained at its former high standard. The company not only has a market in all parts of this country, but in normal times exports shoes to England, S. America, the West Indies and other foreign countries. At the present time and for several years the plant has been running t full capacity, employing 400 hands. Mr. Heywood is a member of the Worcester Club, Tatnuck Country Club, Quinsigamond Boat Club, Engineers Club of New York, the Technology Club of New York, the Phi Gamma Delta Club of New York. He is a trustee of the People’s Savings Bank, trustee of the Worcester Academy, and director of the Merchants National Bank.

Mr. Heywood married Sept. 28, 1899, to Laura Chester Foute, who was born at Adairsville, Georgia, Oct 30, 1873, and died May 10, 1914, a daughter of William Edward and Eliza (Houston-Roberts) Foute. Their children were:

1) Harriet Butler, born Aug. 16, 1901

2) Dorothy Chester, born Oct. 3, 1902

3) Anne Norton, born Oct. 5, 1907

4) Elizabeth Patterson, born Oct. 5, 1907, died July 21, 1910.

His home is at No. 10 Linden Street, Worcester


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Dr. Merrick Bemis History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 pages 217,218,219

Physician, was born in Sturbridge, Mass., May 4, 1820, and died at Herbert Hall in Worcester, Oct. 3, 1904, at 85 years of age. He was a son of Samuel Flagg and Betsey (Barrett) Bemis.

His parents moved from Sturbridge to Charlton when he was quite young. He was brought up on the farm, securing what educational advantages the district schools of his day afforded. He sought a higher education and worked his way through Dudley Academy. He went to Amherst Academy for 2 years with the expectation of going to Amherst College, but on account of sickness he was forced to give up this hope. For several years he taught school in Brookfield, Mass. He began the study of medicine when he was 21 years old, and entered the office of Dr. Winslow Lewis, of Boston, as a student, but continued to pay his way by teaching school in the winters. He attended medical lectures at Pittsfield, Mass., Medical College, where he received the first half of his medical education. He then changed to Castleton Medical College, of Vermont, where in 1848 he received his degree of M.D. He came to Worcester, Nov. 14, 1848, to take the place, temporarily, of one of the physicians in the lunatic asylum, and soon afterward, received an appointment as assistant physician to Dr. George Chandler, the superintendent. Eight years later, in 1856, when Dr. Chandler resigned, Dr. Bemis accepted the position. For 8 months he toured Europe, on a leave of absence, returning to Worcester in 1857 to take charge. He introduced the employment of women physicians in this hospital for the first time. One of his last and most important duties in the State institution was the establishment of the hospital at Bloomingdale, the land for which was bought during the last years of his superintendency of the Summer Street institution. Dr. Bemis resigned his position in 1872 to establish a private hospital for the care and treatment of patients afflicted with various forms of mental and nervous diseases. This hospital is located on Salisbury Street, and after his death was conducted by his son, Dr. John Merrick Bemis, until the latter’s death. It is known as Herbert Hall, which was named after George Herbert, the English poet; this mansion was built in 1855-56, having been completed in the latter year. No mention of Dr. Bemis’ professional career would be complete without referring to his prominence as a specialist in psychiatry. He was frequently called upon by courts in difficult cases of insanity or alleged insanity.

Dr. Bemis practiced in Worcester for almost 56 years. Almost to the day of his death he retained his faculties and heath. It was said of him during the last score of years that he practiced, that he was one of the most active aged men of Worcester, carrying on a business that would tax the energies of a man of 50. The wide range of knowledge and experience in cases of insanity coming under his observation and care during the long connection he had with large institutions for the insane gave him an advantage over most of the specialists in this line of study. He was called often as an expert in consultation, and by the courts. His record of 25 years of continuous service in the State Insane Asylum, at Worcester, was in itself a remarkable record and evidence of his ability and powers of endurance.

When in 1861 the President’s proclamation calling for a force of 75,000 men to take the field immediately, was made, Dr. Bemis earnestly desired to enter the service. He was unable to pass the physical examination, however, but he gave freely of his means to support the Union cause. He organized and equipped a company and sent it to the front. He took an active interest in their welfare while they were in the field, and contributed freely to the support of their families. It was due largely to his efforts that the public subscription to purchase the organ for Mechanics Hall was successful, he, himself, collecting nearly all the money. In 1864 the organ was dedicated. It cost $9,000. and is one of the finest instruments of its kind. Dr. Bemis collected one of the most valuable and interesting libraries in the State, made up, of course, mostly of medical works. He found time too, to devote to public affairs and was a member of the Worcester Board of Aldermen in 1861-62-63. He served at the same time on the school board. This was a particularly important period during the early and darker days of the Civil War. He was a director of the Mechanics National Bank, a member of the Worcester Horticultural Society, the Worcester Society of Antiquity, the Natural History Society, of which he was president until his death, the Massachusetts and Worcester District Medical Societies. the American Medical Assoc., and the New England Psychological Assoc. He was connected with various Masonic bodies. He was a member of the Church of the Unity, and a life member of the American Unitarian Assoc. He was for about 15 years one of the State trustees of the Baldwinville Hospital Cottages for children, in the management and development of which he had taken a leading part, and was president of the corporation at the time of his death. He was the first American physician to take a stand for the division of hospital buildngs for the insane into separate cottages or pavilions. His last illness was but of a few days duration, and he retained all his faculties to the very last moment of his life.

Dr. Bemis married Jan. 1, 1856, Caroline A. Gilmore, whose father was for 30 years a successful practitioner at Brookfield. In his office, in fact, Dr. Bemis received his first lessons in medicine and was started on his professional career while a school teacher at Brookfield. They had one child, John Merrick Bemis, born at Worcester, Feb. 14, 1860. For nearly 20 years Mrs. Bemis was the valuable and efficient matron of the hospital, and afterward, for very many years continued her active duties as matron of the Herbert Hall Asylum. During her extended travels abroad with her husband, se visited hospitals and other institutions, adding the value of her experience by study of foreign methods. Her life work was eminently successful.

His line of ancestry is as follows: Samuel Flagg, John, Abijah, John(3), John(2), John(1), Joseph, who was the immigrant ancestor of Dr. Merrick Bemis, and was born in England about 1619, and came to Watertown, Mass. as early as 1640. He died in 1684.

THE END


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John Merrick Bemis “History of Worcester and Its People” by Charles Nutt; Volume 3 page 219

Physician, was born in the old Summer Street Insane Hospital, Worcester, of which his father was then superintendent, Feb. 14, 1860, only child of Dr. Merrick and Caroline A. (Gilmore) Bemis. The life work of Dr. Bemis was so completely merged and identified with that of his father at Herbert Hall Hospital, that what has been said as to the attainments of the father as a physician and specialist applies equally well to the son. He was educated from the start as a specialist, and had unusual opportunities for practice and hospital study. After his course at the Worcester High School, he became a student at Phillips Andover Academy, but wa obliged, owing to poor health, to leave the academy, and he studied at home for 3 years under private tutors. He then entered the medical department of the University of Vermont, at Burlington, from which institution he was graduated, in 1893, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Later he did special work at the Harvard Medical School, and upon completing his education he returned to Worcester and became associated with his father in the management of Herbert Hall Hospital, which his father founded in 1872, and upon the death of his father, in 1904, he assumed the duties of superintendent of the hospital, servng in that capacity until his death. He was ever a student, studying from time to time at Harvard and Clark University, and frequently he wrote papers for various learned societies. His specialty, of course, was mental diseases. Herbert Hall is the only private hospital in the State devoted to insane patients exclusively, except the McLean Hospital, which is in a class by itself. Herbert Hall is chartered by the State and under State supervision, and ranks high among the institutions of its kind. Dr. Bemis devoted his time almost exclusively to the hospital. He was a trustee of the Baldwinville Hospital Cottages for Children; on the educational committee of the Highland Military Academy of Worcester; a member of the Mass. Medical Society; the Worcester Medical Society; the New England Psychological Society; and the American Psychological Society. In religion he is an Episcopalian.

Dr. John M. Bemis married June 25, 1887, Fannie Bishop Brown, of Andover, Mass., and to this union were born 2 children: 1) Annie Merrick, born Oct. 1, 1888, who married William Wood 2) Caroline Gilmore, born May 25, 1891, who married William Seach, a naval officer in the U.S. Navy.


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Transcribed by Marcia Payne

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